Listening

Opus IOne of the most rewarding aspects about doing art festivals and fairs is the interaction I get to have with the buyers of my work. These interactions both provide me the satisfaction I seek as an artist and idea’s for how to progress with my art. Sometimes I get requests to print a particular image in a size, or in a way which I hadn’t initially intended.

I listen carefully to these requests and if I think the image will work in the form requested and I believe that the customer will be happy with the result, I will comply. Recently, I have received requests for several images which I offer as prints to be done on canvas in sizes ranging from 15×15 to 20×30.  I hadn’t intended to have these works represented on canvas, nor in the sizes which were requested. But I listen carefully to requests and have come to trust that clients often see a presentation of an image that will be wonderful. Usually I can visualize their request and recognize that their ideas are great. Other times I need to see the finished piece before I am fully convinced.

If a request would take a work in a different direction than I intended, or require an alteration to the piece which I do not feel is consistent with my vision, I will just decline the offer. This occurrence is rare however. Mostly, the requests I receive are for a different substrate for the print (e.g., canvas instead of photographic paper), or a different size (e.g., 20×30 instead of 11×14). If I introduce a piece in which I intend only one representation, then I also have to decline special requests. Often however, I will introduce a new piece with flexibility regarding it’s edition composition and so can accommodate special requests. In these cases, I get to listen. And almost always, I like what I hear.

As an example, I recently introduced a new image which I titled Opus I. I printed this impressionistic and somewhat experimental piece as a 9.75″ x 13.75″ on a matte surface paper, matted to 16×20. I am now fulfilling requests made by two customers, one for a 16×24 canvas, the other a 20×30 canvas. Having just finished wrapping these pieces to ship, I can say with certainty that these two requests were well considered. The result was beyond my expectations. These two customers recognized that a larger presentation would bring forth the qualities of this image that pleased me most.

Opus I was made with a lens I am using for a series of botanicals. The lens is actually meant to be used on a projector, not a camera, but was adapted to work with a modern digital camera. I have been wanting to do more impressionistic works and this odd, heavy piece of glass has become one of my tools.

 

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Collector Chooses Robin Picture

Robin 3
Easy Pickins – (c) Paul Grecian

Everyday personal experiences with nature are the foundation to our larger appreciation of the world we live in. Recently a collector of my work named Sandy, shared a story of her affection for the common American Robin. She was interested in a piece that would celebrate her experience of caring for a Robin until it could fly away. I selected two pictures from my collection of images and offered her my first printing of either one.

Happily, Sandy selected a piece in a walnut frame that I will be shipping to her. Her choice was the image I titled Easy Pickins depicting an American Robin on a fruit laden tree. The price for the framed print which includes a nicely finished dust-cover on the back with a pocket for the Certificate of Authenticity, is $129.00. Visit my website for a full selection of available works by clicking HERE.

 

 

“The Bigger Picture”

One of the wonderful things about interacting directly with the collectors of one’s work is that you learn so much from the exchange. I introduced two new works, landscapes, at a Wilmington, Delaware show in July. The images were variations of a single color image that I made in Acadia National Park, Maine. Both images were in black and white and were part of a series of six Artist’s Proofs that I had printed in an attempt to decide how the edition would look going forward.

Ultimately, I decided to offer each of the six proofs and then decide which would be used to make the regular edition. I liked all six interpretations of the image and was comfortable hanging two of them together to express some of the creative process. A couple who collects my work liked the two pieces I exhibited. As we talked, I told them that there were four other interpretations. Their response surprised and excited me. We want all of them then, they said. So the group of six Artist’s Proofs will hang together in one private collection and on one wall. I delivered the works to Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville, NJ where I exhibit my work.

I am thinking now though that the exploration process in the developing and printing of new work can become an interesting and even desired body of work in its own right. When I am convinced that multiple interpretations of a single image are all valid or pleasing to me, I will now consider making those works available as well. Sometimes the “bigger picture” is made up of a group of smaller pictures, even when the base image is the same.

One of six variations on a single image which were purchased as a group by collectors, (c) 2015 Paul Grecian
One of six variations of a single image which were purchased as a group by collectors, (c) 2015 Paul Grecian