Balance of Forces

Balance of Forces

I am introducing a new piece in my botanical series. This image was made using a vintage lens which is some 60-70 years old. I am using a collection of these lenses to achieve a softness and quietness in the images which matches my personal aesthetic.

As an admirer of Piet Mondrian, I am inspired by his work and philosophy.  “Mondrian believed that art reflected the underlying spirituality of nature. He simplified the subjects of his paintings down to the most basic elements, in order to reveal the essence of the mystical energy in the balance of forces that governed nature and the universe.” I especially feel aligned with his philosophy that art reflects the spirituality of nature.

The clean geometry and basic colors of his work makes it dramatic and  very appealing to me. In my image above, which I have titled “Balance of Forces”, I use the lines of the grasses to compose an image with parallel lines and triangular shapes to create a sense of movement and dynamic visual interest. I selected the background for this image first as it is of equal importance to the final result as the foreground grasses. I aligned the area of yellow wildflowers in the background so that they brought the eye to the top center of the image from which the lines of the grasses would then cause exploration throughout the frame.The yellows also provided nice color contrast to the blues throughout the image.

Available as a giclee on either photographic paper or canvas from my gallery on-line.

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Just Sing

I enjoy hearing from collectors about how they live with my work. A recent purchase from my gallery online was for an image of a Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher. It isn’t a picture about the bird however. It’s an image about joyful singing on a beautiful spring day. After Donna C. from New Jersey received her matted pigment print she sent an email to thank me and to let me know “that beautiful singing bird is looking great in my music studio (where I teach voice)!”

In my work the content of the images are rarely what the image is about. I’m more interested in the meaning of the objects in an image, what they stand for, or the emotion they elicit. Birds may serve as metaphors for many things, but joyful singing certainly seems like a good one.

Just Sing

 

“She Will Be Heard”……

She will be Heard webLooking at a picture like this one of a female cardinal, it is very hard not to attribute a human behavior to her. This beautiful bird with her glorious coloration – I mean look at those amazing “eyebrows” – is definitely speaking her mind about something, right? I don’t think we can help but see the image that way, it is human nature.

This new piece will be limited to 100 archival pigment giclee prints in the size of 8″x10″. It is available on my website HERE

 

Shared Story

I always appreciate a collector sharing a story with me about an experience with nature. Recently, a customer told me about her experience with a common bird — the American Robin. I have always been fond of Robins as a sign of Spring; I also think they are an attractive bird, and very much enjoy their melodious song.

Robin 2
Fruitful, (c) 2017 Paul Grecian

Having had purchased my bird work before, this customer asked me about my experience with Robins. That request motivated me to reconnect with some previous images of mine. As a result, I am introducing two new prints. The first piece is titled Fruitful and is of a Robin sitting on a richly fruitful branch. The second piece is titled Easy Pickins which is of a Robin framed by the branches of a fruit covered tree. Click on the names above to see them on my website.

In both images, the Robin is the clear

Robin 3
Easy Pickins, (c) 2017 Paul Grecian

visual element of interest. Both images are also about the bounty of nature which birds rely on to meet their needs. The Robin is not an exotic bird, it is however, one with which we all have some memory and relationship during the year. These types of relationships, the everyday experiences with nature, are our most important.

North Penn Select Craft Show – This Weekend

Dark Spot
“Dark Spot” – (c) 2017 Paul Grecian

For 20 years, the North Penn Select Craft Show has been on my annual show tour. The show is this Saturday, March 18th from 9:30 to 4:30 PM at North Penn High School in Lansdale, PA. I will have a number of new pieces including several made this winter. The snow white background of winter simplifies an image, concentrating the visual experience and amplifying the importance of any element in the piece. The curve of the branch, the fanned-out dried grasses and the placement of the bird, these elements combined represent the total design of this image (titled Dark Spot). It is a minimalist approach, but it feels complete.

The posture of the bird expresses emotion in the same way that the posture of a person does. We can’t help but interpret animal posture through our only knowledge of posture, our own experience. The bird is looking to the left, gazing back, retrospectively. His body faces forward, tail relaxed, confident and secure. All of the lines in the image direct you to the bird. The gaze to the left is balanced by the movement of the branch upward and to the right.

This image was made with a Nikon D810 camera body on a Nikon Nikkor AF 200-400mm f4.0 IS lens with a Nikon TC2.0 III on a Gitzo tripod with a Foba Superball and Wimberley Sidekick. The bird is an American Tree Sparrow characterized by a dark spot on their breast feathers and a yellow lower mandible. They are attractive little birds which I have been working with for several weeks on the farm.

 

Dollars and Sense

It makes no sense at all to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts as the current administration wants to do. It does nothing to balance the budget. It’s purely being considered because of political reasons.

To be honest, I hadn’t realized just how little a budget the NEA was working with. I mean really, less than $150 million a year! To support the arts at a national level for such a paltry amount of money is a disgrace in itself.

Here’s some math I did. I found that 65 million voters selected Clinton for President last year. If half of those voters were to spend even $200 (two hundred dollars) in original works by contemporary (living) artists, it would equal well over $6,000,000,000 (six billion dollars!) in art sales this year. That’s only $200 in original artwork in a year! It’s good for people to have art in their lives, it’s good for the country economically, culturally, socially, and its good for contemporary artists.

I enjoy buying artwork for myself and gifts. I also appreciate it when I receive art as a gift.

Images are Not “Captures”

There are many unfortunate terms used to describe the work and tools of photographers. They come from within the medium itself which makes them even more disturbing. I find the vocabulary especially problematic for photographers who work with the medium as an art form. A making of fine photographs requires a number of decisions about how a particular subject or scene is to be rendered in order to communicate what the photographer-artist wants to convey. The image thus created reflects a complex, although sometimes rather quickly considered, set of thoughts. Words like “shot” and “capture” fall well short of describing the process involved in the making of the art photograph.

As an artist, I am not “capturing” an image. The image does not exist out in the world only to be found and collected by the photographer. Images do not exist in any form in nature. Images are the unique creations of an individual artist and brought into being through their imagination and craftsmanship. I believe that what Jerrold Levinson (American Philosopher) wrote concerning the making of musical works applies to photographic works as well – that “they do not exist prior to the composer’s compositional activity, but are brought into existence by that activity“.

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